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Book Details

Tarzan and the Madman

80% complete
1964
Unknown
Never (or unknown...)
Adventure fiction
Africa - Fiction
Fantasy fiction
Tarzan (Fictitious character) - Fiction
See 33
1 - Friends Or Enemies
2 - The Terra Safaris
3 - Hunted
4 - Captured
5 - Cannibal Feast
6 - In Cold Stood
7 - Abducted
8 - Alemtejo
9 - When The Lion Charged
10 - Human Sacrifice
11 - The Voice In The Night
12 - The King Comes
13 - Captured By Cannibals
14 - "Then The Door Opened"
15 - "Set The White Man Free!"
16 - The Plan That Failed
17 - The White Slave
18 - King Of All The Apes
19 - The Mad Buffalo
20 - The Sultan
21 - The New God
22 - The Battle
23 - In Hiding
24 - Captured By Great Apes
25 - Alone
26 - Gold
27 - Rateng The Hunter
28 - Reunited
29 - Gold And Death
30 - Our Fire Home
31 - "I Am Going To Kill You"
32 - Rand
33 - A Ship
Book Cover
Has a genre Has an extract Has a year read In my library Want to read In a series 
1954
© Copyright, 1964, by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.
No dedication.
Man has five senses, some of which are more or less well developed, some more or less atrophied.
May contain spoilers
"Thank God for everything."
No comments on file
Synopsis not on file
Extract (may contain spoilers)
As Sandra Pickerall stood before the imposing castle of Alemtejo her hopes rose; for she felt that such an imposing edifice must be the abode of civilized men and women--people who would sympathize with her situation and perhaps eventually might be persuaded to return her to her own people.

She had expected to be taken to some squalid, native village, ruled over probably by a black sultan, where she would be reviled and mistreated by perhaps a score of wives and concubines. Her captor’s insistence that she would be a goddess had never impressed her, for she was definitely convinced that the man was insane and thought his stories were but a figment of a deranged mentality.

“So this is the castle of Alemtejo!” she said, half aloud.

“Yes,” said the man. “It is the castle of Cristoforo da Gama, the King of Alemtejo.”

There was no sign of life outside the castle; but when her companion stepped forward and pounded upon the great gate with the hilt of his knife, a man leaned from the barbican and hailed him.

“Who comes?” he challenged; and then, “Oh, it is God who has returned.”

“Yes,” replied the girl’s captor, “It is he whom the king calls God. Admit us, and send word to Cristoforo da Gama, the king, that I have returned and brought a goddess.”

The man left the opening, and Sandra heard him calling to someone upon the inside of the gate, which presently swung slowly open; and a moment later Sandra and her captor filed into the ballium, while the servants of God turned back into the forest.

Inside the gate stood a number of chocolate-colored soldiers wearing helmets of gold and cuirasses of golden chain mail. Their brown legs were bare, and their feet were shod in crude sandals. All wore swords and some carried battleaxes, and others ancient muskets, the latter looking very impressive notwithstanding the fact that there had been no ammunition for them in Alemtejo for nearly four hundred years.

The ballium, which was wide and which evidently extended around the castle, was laid out with rows of growing garden truck, among which both men and women were working. These, too, like the soldiers at the gate, were mostly chocolate-colored. The men wore leather jerkins and broad brimmed hats, and the women a garment which resembled a sarong wound around their hips. The women were naked from the waist up. All showed considerable excitement as they recognized the man; and when, later, he and Sandra were being conducted across the ballium toward the main entrance to the castle, they knelt and crossed themselves as he passed.

Sandra was dumbfounded at this evidence that these people, at least, thought that her companion was a god. Maybe they were all insane. The thought caused her considerable perturbation. It was bad enough to feel that one might be associating with a single maniac, but to be a prisoner in a land of maniacs was quite too awful to contemplate.

Inside the castle they were met by half a dozen men with long gowns and cowls. Each wore a chain of beads from which a cross depended. They were evidently priests. These conducted them down a long corridor to a great apartment which Sandra immediately recognized as a throne-room.

People were entering this apartment through other doorways, as though they had recently been summoned, and congregating before a dais on which stood three throne chairs.

The priests conducted Sandra and her companion to the dais, and as they crossed the room the people fell back to either side and knelt and crossed themselves.

“They really take him seriously,” thought Sandra.

 

Added: 19-May-2017
Last Updated: 17-Nov-2023

Publications

 01-Feb-1965
Ballantine Books
Mass Market Paperback
In my libraryHas a cover imageBook Edition Cover
Date Issued:
Cir 01-Feb-1965
Format:
Mass Market Paperback
Cover Price:
$0.50
Pages*:
160
Catalog ID:
U2023
Internal ID:
33354
Publisher:
ISBN:
Unknown
Printing:
1
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Credits:
Robert Abbett  - Cover Artist
BALLANTINE BOOKS made publishing history by putting back into print all twenty-two adult Tarzan books by Edgar Rice Burroughs.  NOW, we are proud to bring to the public, for the first time as a paperbound book, a NEW novel in the TARZAN series - T23, TARZAN AND THE MADMAN!  Edgar Rice Burroughs titles published by Ballantine Books are complete and unabridged, and all are authorized:

1 TARZAN OF THE APES
2 THE RETURN OF TARZAN
3 THE BEASTS OF TARZAN
4 THE SON OF TARZAN
5 TARZAN & THE JEWELS OF OPAR
6 JUNGLE TALES OF TARZAN
7 TARZAN THE UNTAMED
8 TARZAN THE TERRIBLE
9 TARZAN & THE GOLDEN LION
10 TARZAN & THE ANT MEN
11 TARZAN, LORD OF THE JUNGLE
12 TARZAN & THE LOST EMPIRE
13 TARZAN AT THE EARTH'S CORE
14 TARZAN THE INVINCIBLE
15 TARZAN TRIUMPHANT
16 TARZAN & THE CITY OF GOLD
17 TARZAN & THE LION MAN
18 TARZAN & THE LEOPARD MEN
19 TARZAN'S QUEST
20 TARZAN & THE FORBIDDEN CITY
21 TARZAN THE MAGNIFICENT
22 TARZAN & "THE FOREIGN LEGION"
AND NOW! - 23, TARZAN AND THE MADMAN

TARZAN 23  TARZAN AND THE MADMAN
Fate plays a monstrous trick on the mighty Tarzan, for the legend of his strength and courage has reached so far that strangers whom he has never met seek to exploit and sully his heroic reputation.  And only the might of Tarzan himself can restore the dignity and honor to his name!
Cover:
Book CoverBook Back CoverBook Spine
Notes and Comments:
First Ballantine Printing February 1965
 01-Jan-2018
Global Grey
e-Book
In my libraryHas a cover imageBook Edition Cover
Date Issued:
Cir 01-Jan-2018
Format:
e-Book
Pages*:
176
Internal ID:
2515
Publisher:
ISBN:
Unknown
Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
From globalgreybooks.com:

This is the twenty-third book in the Tarzan Series. Written from January to February 1940, the story was never published in Burroughs' lifetime. Tarzan tracks down a man who has been mistaken for him. The man is under the delusion that he is Tarzan, and he is living in a lost city inhabited by people descended from early Portuguese explorers. The plot devices of a lost city and a Tarzan "double" or impostor had been used by Burroughs in some previous Tarzan novels.
Cover:
Book Cover
Notes and Comments:

All Covers for this edition of the series

Related

Author(s)

 Edgar Rice Burroughs
Birth: 01 Sep 1875 Chicago, Illinois, USA
Death: 19 Mar 1950 Encino, California, USA

Awards

No awards found
*
  • I try to maintain page numbers for audiobooks even though obviously there aren't any. I do this to keep track of pages read and I try to use the Kindle version page numbers for this.
  • Synopses marked with an asterisk (*) were generated by an AI. There aren't a lot since this is an iffy way to do it - AI seems to make stuff up.
  • When specific publication dates are unknown (ie prefixed with a "Cir"), I try to get the publication date that is closest to the specific printing that I can.
  • When listing chapters, I only list chapters relevant to the story. I will usually leave off Author Notes, Indices, Acknowledgements, etc unless they are relevant to the story or the book is non-fiction.
  • Page numbers on this site are for the end of the main story. I normally do not include appendices, extra material, and other miscellaneous stuff at the end of the book in the page count.






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Presented: 15-Jul-2024 03:21:23

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