To Top
[ Books | Comics | Dr Who | Kites | Model Trains | Music | Sooners | People | RVC | Shows | Stamps | USA ]
[ About | Terminology | Legend | Blog | Quotes | Links | Stats | Updates | Settings ]

Book Details

Tarzan and the Castaways

73.3% complete
1965
Unknown
Never (or unknown...)
See 11
Tarzan and the Castaways
24 chapters
Tarzan And The Champion
Tarzan and the Jungle Murders
1 - The Hyena's Voice
2 - The Thread Of Fate
3 - Broken Wings
4 - Jungle Call
5 - The Safari
6 - The Coming Of Tarzan
7 - Murder Will Out
Book Cover
Has a genre Has comments Has an extract Has a year read In my library Want to read In a series 
1955
© 1964 by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.
No dedication.
It is sometimes difficult to know just where to begin a story.
May contain spoilers
And Tarzan of the Apes returned to the jungle.
Comments may contain spoilers
The title story was first published as "The Quest of Tarzan" as a three-part serial in Argosy, starting August 23, 1941.

Tarzan And The Champion © 1940 by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.
Tarzan and the Jungle Murders © 1940 by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.
The Quest of Tarzan © 1941 by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.
Synopsis not on file
Extract (may contain spoilers)
The Saigon crossed the Indian Ocean to Sumatra, where Krause took on two elephants, a rhinoceros, three orangutans, two tigers, a panther, and a tapir. Fearing that de Groote would make good his threat to report the human captive to the authorities at Batavia, Krause did not put in there as he had intended; but continued on to Singapore for monkeys, another tiger, and several boa constrictors; then the Saigon steamed across the South China Sea toward Manila, its last port of call on the long drag to the Panama Canal.

Krause was delighted; so far all his plans had worked out splendidly; and if he got his cargo to New York, he stood to clean up an excellent profit. Perhaps he would not have been so delighted had he known of all that went on aboard the Saigon. Larsen was still confined to his cabin, and while de Groote was a good officer, he was young, and new aboard the ship. Like Krause, he did not know all that was talked of in the forecastle and on deck at night when it was Schmidt's watch. At such times, the 2nd mate spoke long and earnestly with Jabu Singh, the Lascar; and he spoke in whispers. Afterward, Jabu Singh spoke long and earnestly with the other Lascars in the forecastle.

"But the wild beasts?" asked Chand of his fellow Lascar, Jabu Singh; "what of them?"

"Schmidt says we throw them overboard along with de Groote, Krause, and the others."

"They are worth much money," objected Chand; "we should keep them and sell them."

"We would be caught and hanged," said another Lascar.

"No," Jabu Singh contradicted. "While we were in Singapore, Schmidt learned that Germany and England have gone to war. This is an English ship; Schmidt says that a German has a right to capture it. He says we would get prize money; but he thinks the animals would be valueless, and they are a nuisance."

"I know a man on the island of Illili who would buy them," said Chand. "We will not let Schmidt throw them overboard."

The men spoke in their native dialect, confident that the Chinese sailors would not understand them; but in that they were wrong; Lum Kip had once sailed the China Sea aboard a felucca that had been captained and manned by Lascars, and he had learned their language. He had also learned to hate Lascars, as he had been treated very badly aboard the felucca and had been given no share of the spoils of their nefarious operations. But Lum Kip's face gave no indication that he understood what he overheard; it wore its usual expression of profound detachment, as he puffed on his long pipe with its little brass bowl.

The man in the large iron cage on deck often paced back and forth for hours at a time. Often he leaped and seized the bars at the top of the cage and swung to and fro from one end of the cage to the other, hand over hand. When anyone approached his cage, he would stop; for he was not doing these things for his amusement, nor for the amusement of others, but to keep his magnificent physique from deteriorating during his confinement.

Janette Laon came often to his cage; she saw that he was fed regularly and that he always had water; and she tried to teach him her native language, French; but in this she made no headway. Tarzan knew what was the matter with him; and while he could neither speak nor understand speech, his thoughts were as coherent and intelligent as ever. He wondered if he would ever recover; but he was not greatly troubled because he could not converse with human beings; the thing that annoyed him most was that he could no longer communicate with manu, the monkey, or the mangani, the great apes, with which he classed the orangutans that were aboard and confined in cages near his. Seeing the cargo that the Saigon carried, he knew the life that lay in store for him; but he also knew that sooner or later he would escape. He thought of that most often when he saw Abdullah Abu Nejm on deck.

 

Added: 19-May-2017
Last Updated: 17-Nov-2023

Publications

 01-Jul-1965
Ballantine Books
Mass Market Paperback
In my libraryHas a cover imageBook Edition Cover
Date Issued:
Cir 01-Jul-1965
Format:
Mass Market Paperback
Cover Price:
$0.50
Pages*:
191
Catalog ID:
U2024
Internal ID:
33355
Publisher:
ISBN:
Unknown
Printing:
1
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Credits:
Robert Abbett  - Cover Artist
BALLANTINE BOOKS made publishing history by putting back into print all twenty-two TARZAN novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs.  Number 23, TARZAN AND THE MADMAN was a posthumous publication of a new Tarzan book.  NOW, we are proud to bring to the public, FOR THE FIRST TIME AS A PAPERBOUND BOOK, a second posthumous publication - Tarzan 24 - TARZAN AND THE CASTAWAYS.  Edgar Rice Burroughs titles published by Ballantine Books are complete and unabridged, and all are authorized:

1 TARZAN OF THE APES
2 THE RETURN OF TARZAN
3 THE BEASTS OF TARZAN
4 THE SON OF TARZAN
5 TARZAN & THE JEWELS OF OPAR
6 JUNGLE TALES OF TARZAN
7 TARZAN THE UNTAMED
8 TARZAN THE TERRIBLE
9 TARZAN & THE GOLDEN LION
10 TARZAN & THE ANT MEN
11 TARZAN, LORD OF THE JUNGLE
12 TARZAN & THE LOST EMPIRE
13 TARZAN AT THE EARTH'S CORE
14 TARZAN THE INVINCIBLE
15 TARZAN TRIUMPHANT
16 TARZAN & THE CITY OF GOLD
17 TARZAN & THE LION MAN
18 TARZAN & THE LEOPARD MEN
19 TARZAN'S QUEST
20 TARZAN & THE FORBIDDEN CITY
21 TARZAN THE MAGNIFICENT
22 TARZAN & "THE FOREIGN LEGION"
23 TARZAN AND THE MADMAN
24 TARZAN AND THE CASTAWAYS


TARZAN 24 TARZAN AND THE CASTAWAYS
Not one, but three stories about Tarzan, each a novelette complete within itself, in which the splendid creature from the jungles of Africa pits himself against the blood-cult of an ancient Mayan civilization.
Cover:
Book CoverBook Back CoverBook Spine
Notes and Comments:
First hardcover edition published by Canaveral Press, Inc.
First Ballantine printing July 1965
 01-Jan-2018
Global Grey
e-Book
In my libraryHas a cover imageBook Edition Cover
Date Issued:
Cir 01-Jan-2018
Format:
e-Book
Pages*:
191
Internal ID:
2516
Publisher:
ISBN:
Unknown
Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
From globalgreyebooks.com:

This is the twenty-fourth and last book in the Tarzan Series. In addition to the title novella, it includes two Tarzan short stories; Tarzan and the Champion, and, Tarzan and the Jungle Murders. Of the three pieces, Tarzan and the Jungle Murders was written first, in January 1939. It was first published in the magazine Thrilling Adventures in the issue for June 1940. Tarzan and the Champion was written in July 1939, and first published in Blue Book Magazine in the issue for April 1940. Tarzan and the Castaways was begun in November 1940 and first published in the magazine Argosy Weekly as a three-part serial in the issues for August 23, August 30, and September 6, 1941.
Cover:
Book Cover
Notes and Comments:
The stories in this e-book are in a different order than the ones published in the Ballantine Books first printing of the paperback version:
  • Tarzan And The Champion
  • Tarzan and the Jungle Murders
  • Tarzan and the Castaways

All Covers for this edition of the series

Related

Author(s)

 Edgar Rice Burroughs
Birth: 01 Sep 1875 Chicago, Illinois, USA
Death: 19 Mar 1950 Encino, California, USA

Awards

No awards found
*
  • I try to maintain page numbers for audiobooks even though obviously there aren't any. I do this to keep track of pages read and I try to use the Kindle version page numbers for this.
  • Synopses marked with an asterisk (*) were generated by an AI. There aren't a lot since this is an iffy way to do it - AI seems to make stuff up.
  • When specific publication dates are unknown (ie prefixed with a "Cir"), I try to get the publication date that is closest to the specific printing that I can.
  • When listing chapters, I only list chapters relevant to the story. I will usually leave off Author Notes, Indices, Acknowledgements, etc unless they are relevant to the story or the book is non-fiction.
  • Page numbers on this site are for the end of the main story. I normally do not include appendices, extra material, and other miscellaneous stuff at the end of the book in the page count.






See my goodreads icon goodreads page. I almost never do reviews, but I use this site to catalogue books.
See my librarything icon librarything page. I use this site to catalogue books and it has more details on books than goodreads does.


Presented: 15-Jul-2024 04:37:29

Website design and original content
© 1996-2024 Type40 Web Design.
Contact: webmgr@type40.com
Server: type40.com
Page: bksDetails.aspx
Section: Books

This website uses cookies for use in navigating this site only. No personal information is gathered or shared with anyone. If you don't agree, then don't use this site.