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Book Details

Tarzan the Magnificent

80% complete
1939
73,670
Unknown
Never (or unknown...)
See 25
1 - Out of the Past
2 - A Strange Tale
3 - The Power of Mafka
4 - Sentenced to Death
5 - The Black Panther
6 - Trapped
7 - Green Magic
8 - The Leopard Pit
9 - The End of the Corridor
10 - Toward Freedom
11 - Treachery
12 - Reunion
13 - Cannibals
14 - Kidnapped
15 - Clues
16 - Tantor
17 - Strangers
18 - Ingratitude
19 - Retribution
20 - Athne
21 - Phoros
22 - Menofra
23 - Sentenced
24 - Death
25 - Battle
Book Cover
Has a genre Has comments Has an extract Has a year read In my library Want to read In a series 
1952
Copyright © by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc. 1939
To
Cyril Ralph Rothmund
Truth is stranger than fiction.
May contain spoilers
You and Gonfala should be well equipped with wealth when you return to civilization - you should have enough to get you into a great deal of trouble and keep you there all the rest of your lives."
Comments may contain spoilers
Originally published in Argosy magazine under the title "Tarzan and the Magic Men," copyright © by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., 1936, and its sequel in Blue Book of Fiction and Adventure under the title "Tarzan and the Elephant Men," copyright © Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., 1937.  Both novels combined to form the book "Tarzan the Magnificent," copyright © by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc. 1939.

This story appeared originally as two novelettes.  "Tarzan and the Magic Men" was first published serially in Argosy magazine from September 19 to October 3, 1936.  A sequel, "Tarzan and the Elephant Men" was published serially in Blue Book magazine from November, 1937, through January, 1938.  These two stories were combined and published in book form in 1939 under the title of "Tarzan the Magnificent."
Synopsis not on file
Extract (may contain spoilers)
The guards in the corridor outside the throne–room were so surprised to see anyone coming from the throneroom at that time in the night that Lord was past them before they recovered their wits. They pursued him, shouting commands to halt, to the doorway of the guard–room where, by this time, all the women warriors were aroused and leaping to arms.

Lorro was the first to recognize the Englishman. "What is it, Lord?" she demanded. "What are you doing here? How did you get out of the cell? What has happened?"

"The great emerald!" cried Lord. "The Kaji has killed Woora and stolen the great emerald."

"Killed Woora!" exclaimed half a dozen of the women in unison. "You mean that Woora is dead?"

"Yes, yes," replied Lord impatiently. "But the emerald's stolen. Can't you understand that?"

"Woora is dead!" screamed the women; as with one accord they rushed for the village street to spread the happy tidings.

Out in the night, a short distance beyond the village, Tarzan heard the commotion, followed by the hoarse notes of a primitive trumpet. He recognized the call to arms to which now was added the throbbing of the war drums, and guessed that Lord had spread the alarm and was organizing a pursuit.

The ape–man increased his speed, moving unerringly along the trail that he had passed over but once before, and that at night; and behind him came the entire tribe of Zuli warrior women with their white men and their black slaves.

Lord had at last succeeded in impressing on the minds of the Zuli that the death of Woora was an empty beneficence without possession of the emerald that was to have given them wealth and independence in the outer world; so that it was an angry, blood– thirsty mob that pursued the Lord of the Jungle through the soft African night.

Plain to the ears of the ape–man came the sounds of the pursuit, and he guessed the temper of the pursuers. If they overtook him, he could hope for neither victory nor quarter. There were too many of them for the one, and they were too angry and too savage to accord the other. Only the cunning of the wild beast that environment and training had implanted within him could avail him against such odds.

As he trotted along the winding trail that led up the course of the rivulet toward the divide he became acutely aware of a presence that he could not see. His acute senses told him that he was alone, yet the feeling persisted that he was not alone. Something moved with him, clinging as closely as his shadow. He stopped to listen. The thing seemed so near that he should have heard it breathe, but there was no sound. His keen nostrils sought a clue—there was none.

As he trotted on he sought to reason out the mystery. He even tried to convince himself that he was the victim of a delusion; but Tarzan had never had a delusion—he had only heard that others sometimes had them. And always the presence was with him, haunting him like a ghost.

 

Added: 19-May-2017
Last Updated: 27-Apr-2023

Publications

 01-Mar-1964
Ballantine Books
Mass Market Paperback
In my libraryHas a cover imageBook Edition Cover
Date Issued:
Cir 01-Mar-1964
Format:
Mass Market Paperback
Cover Price:
$0.50
Pages*:
192
Catalog ID:
U2021
Internal ID:
13182
Publisher:
ISBN:
Unknown
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Credits:
Richard Powers  - Cover Artist
BALLANTINE BOOKS made publishing history with the simultaneous publication of the first ten volumes in the series of twenty-two adult Tarzan books by EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS.  These were followed in sequence by numbers eleven and twelve.  NOW, with the simultaneous release of the last ten volumes, the entire Tarzan series is available in BALLANTINE BOOKS editions - all complete and unabridged, all authorized:

1 TARZAN OF THE APES
2 THE RETURN OF TARZAN
3 THE BEASTS OF TARZAN
4 THE SON OF TARZAN
5 TARZAN & THE JEWELS OF OPAR
6 JUNGLE TALES OF TARZAN
7 TARZAN THE UNTAMED
8 TARZAN THE TERRIBLE
9 TARZAN & THE GOLDEN LION
10 TARZAN & THE ANT MEN
11 TARZAN, LORD OF THE JUNGLE
12 TARZAN & THE LOST EMPIRE
13 TARZAN AT THE EARTH'S CORE
14 TARZAN THE INVINCIBLE
15 TARZAN TRIUMPHANT
16 TARZAN & THE CITY OF GOLD
17 TARZAN & THE LION MAN
18 TARZAN & THE LEOPARD MEN
19 TARZAN'S QUEST
20 TARZAN & THE FORBIDDEN CITY
21 TARZAN THE MAGNIFICENT
22 TARZAN & "THE FOREIGN LEGION"

TARZAN 21  TARZAN THE MAGNIFICENT

Two tribes of frightful warrior women, the Kaji and the Zuli, war with one another for possession of the men they lure into slavery.  Their mysterious hypnotic power comes from the magnificent gems they worship - an emerald and a diamond, each as big as a human head.  Will the Lord of the Jungle be immune to the strange power of the Kaji and the Zuli?
Cover:
Book CoverBook Back CoverBook Spine
Notes and Comments:
First Printing: March 1964
 01-Jan-2014
ePub Books
e-Book
In my libraryHas a cover imageBook Edition Cover
Date Issued:
Cir 01-Jan-2014
Format:
e-Book
Pages*:
294
Internal ID:
2513
Publisher:
ISBN:
Unknown
Country:
United States
Language:
English
From epubbooks.com:

The bones of a dead man, a black runner still clutching a cleft stick containing a message…Tarzan, mighty man of the forest, finds it and learns of the captivity of a white man and his beautiful daughter. Courageously going to their rescue, Tarzan finds they are in the hands of the Kaji, a mysterious tribe of warrior women who will mate only with white men. Thus begins Tarzan’s most fantastic adventure, one that will keep you on the edge of your seat in excitement.
Cover:
Book Cover
Notes and Comments:

Related

Author(s)

 Edgar Rice Burroughs
Birth: 01 Sep 1875 Chicago, Illinois, USA
Death: 19 Mar 1950 Encino, California, USA

Awards

No awards found
*
  • I try to maintain page numbers for audiobooks even though obviously there aren't any. I do this to keep track of pages read and I try to use the Kindle version page numbers for this.
  • Synopses marked with an asterisk (*) were generated by an AI. There aren't a lot since this is an iffy way to do it - AI seems to make stuff up.
  • When specific publication dates are unknown (ie prefixed with a "Cir"), I try to get the publication date that is closest to the specific printing that I can.
  • When listing chapters, I only list chapters relevant to the story. I will usually leave off Author Notes, Indices, Acknowledgements, etc unless they are relevant to the story or the book is non-fiction.
  • Page numbers on this site are for the end of the main story. I normally do not include appendices, extra material, and other miscellaneous stuff at the end of the book in the page count.






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